Continuing to Navigate

Rapids 2Last week, Coach Terry, PhD, PCC shared 3 steps on how to use political savvy to expand your influence in a positive way. Well, Coach Terry is back to share the final steps to developing your political strategy.

Take it away, Terry!

Screen Shot 2014-10-10 at 1.14.22 PMNow that we have recognized the key players, identified their interests, and mapped out their power and authority, let’s focus on getting our political strategy defined.

 

Step 4: Conflicts and Alliances

 

In every situation there are likely to be natural conflicts. While you may have had a strong alliance with a key leader yesterday, a new topic may emerge where you now find yourselves at odds. You can better predict likely conflicts by understanding the interests of key players. Frequent contact with the key players is crucial for political savvy.

 

Best Practice: Mapping out the alliances and the conflicts in any given political situation helps you better understand how decisions may be influenced within an organization.

 

Step 5: Political Strategy

 

In this final step, you will synthesize steps 1 through 4 to develop your political strategy.

 

Consider the following key questions:

 

  • Who are my allies that are likely to support me?
  • Who are my detractors, and how much power do they have?
  • Do I have enough support to overcome objections?
  • Who do I need to talk to further to better understand their positions, concerns, and interests?
  • Do I have enough relationship capital to influence those in authority to get what I want?
  • Is the timing right, or should I wait until there is more support for my position?
  • If I move forward, what will be the likely outcome in terms of future support or resistance from stakeholders?

 

The ultimate goal here is to continually build alliances and to avoid making enemies over the long haul.

 

As a reminder, political savvy can be used in an ethical way in an organization to increase your influence and build relationships. By understanding political savvy as a process, anyone can develop the skills to be successful in maneuvering organizational politics to achieve greater influence and business results.

 

So, try it out! Opportunities come up all the time to expand your influence, wherever you are in your organization.

Let us know how it goes!

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I Just Don’t Have Time!

Even if you are not usually a list-loving person, the chances are, with all that’s on your plate – you have lots of lists.

And, adding something – anything – to that list just makes it feel even more impossible to get everything done.

When we heard from Lisa Harper, an executive Coach for over 20 years, she said that one reason we don’t delegate is because, “we feel we don’t have time to explain the project or task and we think it’s easier to just do it ourselves, not thinking about the long term impact this can have”.

Ringing a (rather loud) bell?

Here’s what she suggests:

Lisa HarperConsider the long term benefits of delegation versus the small amount of time invested to delegate a task.  Is it more productive to spend a little time now teaching someone else how to do something or continue to do it yourself?

Understand that one of the key responsibilities for managers is the building of their talent bench. Your employees deserve work that challenges and stretches their capabilities.  Delegating interesting projects and tasks is a way to do that.  

Remember that a lack of delegation can translate into unmotivated employees resulting in turnover which is expensive and even more time-consuming.

Many of my clients tell me their manager wants them to be more strategic.  Use this time to focus on the higher level goals of your business, team or work group.”

Wow! Thanks, Lisa!

Take a look at the week ahead and all you have to accomplish.

Even though finding the time to train someone on the new task may seem impossible, consider Lisa’s suggestions above and think about the long-term benefits of you delegating a task next week!