How to be a Great Manager if You Tend to be Diplomatic and You Need to Drive Results

screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-2-48-07-pm

 

This week we have Coach Shannon Goodwin with us sharing her thoughts on how to be a great Manager if you tend to be diplomatic and you have got to drive some results!

Take it away, Shannon!

screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-2-40-20-pm

“If you are a Manager who tends to be diplomatic, that is often an indicator that you have high interpersonal sensitivity and that you easily and effectively build positive relationships across the organization. These are valuable skills!

 

For Managers who have the strength of diplomacy, there are times when driving results and confronting performance issues can be a challenge. Here are a few ideas to keep in mind if you’re one of them:

 

Use your natural ability to build positive relationships! Understand individual motivators and match mission-critical business projects to the people who will be motived by them.

 

Learn as much as you can about your people– their motivators, career goals, skills and talents. That way, when you need to assign a project or task to drive results, you can look for opportunities to match the people on your team with the projects that will be motivating for them!

 

If the task or project isn’t that exciting or inspirational, recognize and emphasize the value that the task or requirement brings to the company, clients, or the bottom line.

 

The key here is to be genuine and not to try to put the proverbial ‘lipstick on a pig’ or over represent the excitement or attraction of the task if it isn’t there.

 

Make performance goals as clear as possible.

 

Most of us have heard about the importance of having SMART goals. Whenever possible, apply the SMART framework with your team to make sure that their performance expectations are clear.

 

When we have SMART goals, it becomes much easier to assess whether or not they were achieved.

 

When someone didn’t meet expectations, have a candid conversation with them to find out what happened.

 

Most people who are high in diplomacy are not as eager to have these conversations. Whether we’re comfortable with them or not, it is often helpful to prepare ahead of time and to use an approach that will facilitate a constructive conversation.  Below are some tips that you can use to prepare:

  • Plan what you want to say ahead of time; practice aloud and/or write down a few bullets to help you remember your key points. Stay factual and avoid being accusatory or judgmental.

 

Be in a state of curiosity and inquiry; ask open-ended questions. Listen and breathe. Reiterate what you heard.

  • “Mary, the XYZ report was due on Monday. I didn’t see the report in my inbox. What happened?”
  • “So, you wanted to get the report done and you were traveling back from China when your laptop battery died before you had a chance to send it?”

Reiterate the business need. Let the person explore and own the solution. Encourage multiple options.

  • “The XYZ reports need to be submitted by Monday so that we can accurately report the metrics to corporate and ensure all of the commissions are counted before they go to payroll.” 
  • “What could you do to avoid this in the future and ensure that the XYZ report is submitted in time?” 
  • “What else could you try?”
    • Set a time to follow up, if needed.
  • “When would you like to follow up on this?”
  • “Would you mind sending me a calendar invite for that?”

Thank you, Shannon!!

Advertisements

Your Ever-Changing Team

Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 10.43.13 AM

Whether you’ve been a manager for 2 weeks or 20 years, I think we can all agree that building teams that work well together is an art.

Teams are always changing – even if you’ve had the same people working for you for a significant amount of time, the individuals are continuing to change and grow, and in turn, your team changes and grows.

Over the next couple of weeks, a few of our great Coaches will share suggestions on how to promote more collaboration and encourage efficiency with chatty members.

Before we dive into how to grow as a team, spend 10 or 15 minutes this week thinking about your team.

  • How would you (or others!) currently describe your team?
  • What do you want your team to be known for?
  • How do you want your team to grow over the next year?

Thinking about where you want to lead your people to is the first step in getting there!

Celebrate Your Wins

Celebrate Your VictoriesWe’ve got some goals. And, we know what is driving these goals.

How do you feel? Nervous? Excited? Ready to jump in? Anticipating the busyness of life to pick up soon? We feel all those too.

It is exciting to set goals. Sometimes, though, I feel like it takes a lot to reach them.

This week, we have Coach Teresa Wallace back to share another tip about setting goals.

Here is her encouragement:

Teresa Wallace“Build small wins into your larger goals. 

 

Remember, a journey of a thousand miles starts with just one step. 

 

Celebrate that one step, because now you only have 999 more steps to get to your ultimate goal!  Hey, that’s less than 1000 steps!

 

As you celebrate each small win, your confidence builds, your motivation soars, and you reengage with the larger goal. 

 

A great way to do this is by setting goal levels. 

 

What’s the minimum you can accomplish on the goal and still feel like you’re moving forward? What’s in the middle (a realistic stretch)?  What’s the big goal? 

 

Even if you don’t meet the big goal right away, you’re still taking steps forward!”

 

Take those goals you have written and add in “mini” goals along the way.

And, don’t forget to let us know once you’ve made some of those. We would love to celebrate your wins with you!

Moving Beyond SMART Goals

GOALSLast week we took the words we want to use to describe 2015 and turned some of those words into goals, using the SMART filter.

But maybe you’re pretty familiar with the SMART goal guidelines and you are looking for a little more depth… well – you are in luck! This post is for you!

We have the privilege to hear from Coach Jim Kelly this week.  Jim loves to challenge people to discover new solutions to achieve the goals they have set for themselves.

Here are some of Jim’s thoughts:

Jim Kelly“Everybody talks about SMART goals, specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and with a time specified. That’s a good start for how to set goals.  But for those who have been setting goals for awhile, a more in-depth approach might be useful.

Understand WHY you’re setting a goal. Ask yourself:

 

  • Is this something I want and am passionate about (feeling-based and intrinsic rewards)

OR

  • Is it something I think I should do/be/have and will need to force myself to work on (thought-based and extrinsic rewards)

We often hear, “do what you love and the money will come” and that works sometimes. But other times, it might be helpful to prioritize extrinsic rewards.

Let’s look again at those goals that we chose for 2015.  Are they goals that push you towards something you are passionate about?  Things that you can’t wait to accomplish?  Or are they “stretch” goals that you will need a little extra push to start and keep working on.

Knowing the “why” behind the goals you’ve chosen can help you know what types of check points and rewards will be helpful to set.

Creating Your Goals

SMARTThis week we have the chance to move into actually creating some of our goals, so let’s jump in!

Grab that list of words you created on how you want to describe 2015. Last week we made sure these were all things that inspire us and not tasks we feel we have to do.

Ok – now choose one of the words you wrote down. Let’s dig a bit- what are three things you would need to accomplish to make that word a reality?

Now that you have a starting point, lets hear from Coach Tim Kincaid, to craft these into actionable goals. Tim is an executive Coach who specializes in helping leaders become more focused, effective, and successful.

Screen Shot 2015-01-16 at 12.55.13 PM“I like the SMART goal approach, which is a popular model.  Run any goal through the SMART filter.

S = Specific

Vague goals render vague results. Specific means you can articulate the details of the goal:

Ask: What do you want to accomplish?  Why is this important and can you name specific benefits or purposes? Who is involved and who will benefit? Where is the location? Which requirements and constraints are anticipated? 

 

M = Measurable

How you will quantify or measure the outcome.

Ask: When the goal is accomplished, state how you will know – what will be different?

What gets measured gets done!

 

A = Actionable / Attainable

State how the goal will be accomplished and results attained.

Ask: What actions are necessary or possible to accomplish the goal?

 

R = Relevant / Realistic

The goal is directly relevant to desired outcome and is a goal that truly matters. The goal also is realistic. It may cause you to really “stretch” but also has a realistic chance of success.

 

T = Time-bounded

A SMART Goal has specific milestones and deadlines to measure progress.

Ask: By when will specific sub tasks and the final goal be completed?  

T= can also stand for Thrilling – is this goal juicy, scary and exciting? There is lots of momentum to Thrilling goals!

Use the SMART criteria to turn those three ideas into achievable goals.

And, doesn’t the progress feel GREAT?

Resolutions

confetti

With a new year comes new resolutions. Are you thinking of one or two? I am.

I think of resolutions as goals. And the Wikipedia definition of a New Year’s Resolution is pretty much described as a personal goal. That’s dandy except that resolutions are notorious for being broken as quickly as they’re made. Why?

Well, my theory is that too many resolutions are made at once. And that while the personal desire to change exists when we declare a resolution, many of the other supporting pieces that are needed to achieve success are not in place.

Some things to think about that apply both to goals and resolutions:

1. What’s the desired outcome? Looking at the big picture, how will you know you’ve succeeded?

2. Why this goal/resolution? Why is this important to you right now, this coming year? If you can’t answer these questions with a convincing argument, don’t bother with the resolution.

3. Use the SMART goals acronym.

SMART is used when setting goals because good goals have the following characteristics –

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Achievable
  • Relevant
  • Timely

4. Do you have the right support? Goals are achieved when supported. Same goes for resolutions. Do you have the time or will you make the time to succeed? Are the folks around you supportive? Do you have the resources to accomplish your goal/resolution? And if not, can you find the resources?

I’m off to think about my resolution for the year.

Happy New Year!