Connecting with Your Team

Tired Team Image

Patience is wearing thin in meetings, pod-mates are starting to bicker, and a lot more coffee has been flowing from the office coffeepot than you’d like to acknowledge.

We’ve all had those days/weeks/quarters – you can tell your team is tired.

There have been pressing deadlines and long days and exciting things happening in the business, but you can tell that something more is needed than just thanking your team for all their hard work.

This week we have Coach Bonnie Davis with us to share a tip on how to help motivate a tired team.

Take it away Bonnie!

Bonnie Davis“One tool that I have found works well to motivate a team that has a high degree of trust with each other and their manager is an exercise called “Hard Truths.”   This can be led by the manager or a neutral facilitator.

 

I would open the exercise by first acknowledging the current work environment, share how it’s been impacting me personally, also share what I see as the positive aspects, and then ask them to share their “hard truths” about why they are tired.  

 

Hard truths are facts that are difficult that we deal with. and though we often can’t control them, we can do our best to lessen their negative impacts. 

 

The goal?

 

To give the team the time and space to explore what is difficult at work so they feel someone is listening and cares, and then they can figure out how to move past it and support each other.   

 

Each person should share something that is difficult in the current environment, such as customer demands, organizational change, new leadership, too many projects, and so on. There are no “wrong answers” — everyone’s perspective is valid. 

 

Then, the group should select 2-3 of these “hard truths” as focus areas that they feel could make the greatest impact once solved. 

 

Finally, they should do a brainstorm on 1-2 solutions for each focus area. 

 

The manager should close the meeting by once again acknowledging everyone’s hard work and where it’s paying off, reiterate his or her support, encourage each team member to follow up directly if they’d like to talk about it some more, and then set a follow up meeting for about thirty days later when the group can hold themselves accountable for the actions and see how they’ve progressed.”

 

Thanks, Bonnie!

What a great suggestion on how to encourage you team to talk about what has been tiring and brainstorm solutions on how to move past it together.

Try this with your team and let us know how it goes!

Strategy – Where Do I Begin?

So, now that you have freed up some of your time you can focus a little more on strategy.

Yes!! … Or yikes?

The word strategy can be a little intimidating. You know you want your team to be working together better, developing new ideas, or hitting new sales goals – but sometimes it’s hard to know where to start.

Larry Page, the CEO and cofounder of Google, has revolutionized the industry (and really the world) by using a strategy called 10X thinking.

10X thinking works like this…

Most companies, leaders, and managers look at their current situation and strategize how to grow whatever they are doing by 10%.

For example, if we want our team to work together better we may look at how to improve collaboration. To improve collaboration by 10% we would probably schedule one additional brainstorming meeting a week.

But in 10X thinking, we would strategize how to have our team improve collaboration by 10 times – or over 100%.

Using this method, to improve collaboration would be to totally restructure how the team works, where they are seated, how they present ideas, and how they execute work.

10X thinking completely changes the perspective in solving a problem or growing a team because it looks at revolutionizing the entire process vs. trying to improve one aspect and being less likely to think innovatively and outside the box.

This week, choose one aspect of your team or management life where you would like to become 10X more effective!