Take One Small Step

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When it comes to self-care, you often try tackling those insurmountable bad habits you’ve accumulated. Eating healthier, for example, isn’t just simply bringing a salad to work. It’s a whole hullabaloo in meal planning, grocery shopping, produce chopping, finding a little container for your salad dressing, remembering to put it in your work bag…
Why not try taking a small step towards self-care instead? Here are some tried and true, easy life hacks you can do RIGHT NOW.

Give yourself a little “woo hoo!”

Write a note to remind yourself of something good you’ve done. Being a leader is hard. There isn’t enough praise and recognition for the millions of hours you’ve put into your work. So, be your own cheerleader. Extra points if you open your note and reread it when you need that extra ego boost from your number one fan (You!).

Gift your inner child

What was something that soothed you as a kid? Try getting hot chocolate with whipped cream instead of coffee. Stream a playlist from the hit songs you listened to a teen. Switch to the soap you bathed with as a child. Let the warm feelings of childhood wash over you whenever you can.

Go on a low information diet

You don’t need to know every single thing that is going on. For you, that could mean paring down your social media feeds to one or two platforms. Take the plunge and stop push notifications on your phone after 8pm. Unplug completely. Working at optimal levels means having “flow”, and that’s impossible when you do those little quick checks in an effort to quiet distractions.

Call your person

Part of self-care is to surround yourself with good people. Those who will lift you up and consistently bring you joy. At work, that is not always a viable option. Meetings, phone calls, and evaluations are draining. Who is that special person in your life that you never dread catching up with? Even introverts have at least one person in their social circle who recharges their battery. Go ahead and give them a ring.

Final Thoughts

Stay vigilant in the realm of self-care. The number one strategy is knowing that you NEED a strategy. Remember that you are your most important investment. Taking care of yourself now will pay dividends later. Try it!

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That Moment When You Still Need Productivity to Increase

That Moment When You Still Need Productivity to Increase

Last week we started with some tips on what to do when you really need productivity to increase for you and your team.

Did you have a chance to try out any of the tips?

This week, we’ve got Caroline back with some more suggestions.

Screen Shot 2017-05-19 at 2.32.57 PMBuild Relationships – As a manager, you are building the bridges with other groups that will enable your directs to get things done.

Building trusted relationships within your group, and outside of your group.

What are some ways to do this?

  • Spend time with your peers
  • Find out what is important to them
  • Build strong relationships so you can reach out via email, text, etc., and gain a quick response

A lot of times, the slow down in productivity is due to a lack of response from another group.

Well, you are all in an environment where you receive a huge number of emails and texts, and are in meetings everyday…so how can your asks stand out? Is it a situation where you need to actually make a call? If you have a trusted relationship built, you will gain a quicker response because you are known and they trust that the request is actually needed and important.

Manage the energy – …yes, you are responsible for keeping up your energy and the energy of your group.

For creating a positive work environment.

When you are working in a really fast paced, intense environment, it’s hard to perform at your maximum and maintain composure when your energy is low. This is really important for managers when you are often moving from one meeting to another.

So I use my calendar. Keep it simple.

Your calendar is not just about scheduling meetings. That’s the least it can do. I usually recommend on a Sunday evening or Monday morning taking a look at your calendar for the week – 10 minutes of calendar planning.

So where are you really tight? Which meetings do you really need to be at your best? Which ones do you need to be in and for how long? How can you insert a short amount of time to regenerate a bit when you are a key player?

  • What can you delegate?
  • What are the top priorities?
  • What do you have to get done that day?

If you are stressed and performing at a lower level, this will make it difficult for your employees to perform well.

If you are introverted, then ensure you have enough quiet time here and there to regroup.

If you are extroverted, roam around – take the long way to the coffee room and interact along the way.

It takes only a few minutes and can make a huge difference if you purposefully build in “energizers” into your work day.

It’s not rocket science. It is less complex than all the technical issues you have solved so far in your career, and it will result in you accomplishing more in less time.

Lastly – Be inclusive.

When you are stuck on a challenge or need to be in too many places at once – involve your team. Discuss openly the challenges and have them get involved.

This will create greater trust, ownership, and buy-in so your team will work together more effectively – AND productivity will be higher with greater ownership and buy in.

A great leader once said to me … “even if you know the answer, ask for input”.

Input is not just for when you don’t know – it is to seek other views, to create involvement, and to create energy around a project.

A golden rule of mine is always err on the side on inclusion, not exclusion.

Interaction, inclusion, discussion…create those in your group.

They invite creativity and raise the energy of the group.”

That Moment When You Really Need Productivity to Increase and It’s Not

That Moment When You Really Need Productivity to Increase and It’s Not

If you are a Manager then you’ve got ‘em … direct reports!

These guys make you, and sometimes it can feel like they break you too. The success of your team lies within you and each of your direct reports.

So, for the next few weeks we will have some more of our expert Coaches here to share with you some of their best tips and tricks when it comes to managing direct reports.

To kick us off this week (and next!), we’ve got Coach Caroline Paoletti sharing some of her best tips on how to motivate your team when you HAVE to increase productivity.

Let’s jump in!

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“My approach as a leader was always to learn and work with each direct report in a way that was meaningful for them. This shows caring, builds trust, and allows you to learn the details of what helps them be their highest performing self. This will automatically create high productivity. So let’s talk about some practical things you can do, starting now!

Step 1: Define the Goal (what the team needs to accomplish).

Now what?

Think about:

  • What can you do to contribute positively to the goal?
  • What do you need to know to enable your employees to perform to their full potential and achieve their goal?
  • Have you clearly articulated what they need to achieve so that they understand?

The answers to these questions will create your roadmap.

Some of the answers may be different for different managers, and different for each of your direct reports.

That’s a good thing.

Step 2: Know what motivates your directs.

My favorite question for this conversation is “What is a great day at work for you?”. It sets you up to get a descriptive answer with tons of information.

As an example, if they say “analyzing reports and finding the common thread”, they are probably introverted, prefer to work quietly, and enjoy finding a complex solution.

So if you want them to be more productive, it’s probably not good to give them 8 hours of presentations, Knowing what motivates them can increase their energy and ability to be really productive.

Giving them assignments contrary to their motivators will zap their energy and lead to a lower level of productivity.

Knowing your directs and how to (and what!) to delegate to each is essential.

Step 3: Find out what is hard for your directs (and work with them to actively develop that area).

Often people procrastinate around tasks that are uncomfortable.

Ask the question, how can you help them come up with a plan that enables them to move forward quickly?

One of your key roles is removing the roadblocks.

Your group is going to handle the 80 or 90% that fits in the routines of the organizations systems. Your job as a manager is in dealing with the other % that does not fit the normal routines of the organization.

Reducing the roadblocks saves your team tons of time and is one of your key contributions to higher productivity.

So, this week try it out: set a clear goal, begin to ask what motivates your team, and learn one that task that is more challenging for them in their current role.

And come back next week to learn a couple more tips from Caroline!

Planning for More Change

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So, how is your planning for change going?

Last week we got a couple of tips from Coach Melissa Creede. This week she is back with some additional things to plan for!

Take it away, Melissa.

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Let’s look again at what Sarah and other could have done differently to ensure a successful change endeavour.

3. Make it tangible and relevant to each person’s reality

Resistance often comes from employees feeling as though a change is being thrust upon them with no clear idea of the purpose of the initiative. They also might feel stress or anxiety around ‘what does it mean for me?’ ‘How will this affect my day-to-day work?’. Sarah is a great visionary, but she doesn’t always stop and think about the impact to the individual employees. Since she had no vested interest in their current reality, she underestimated theirs.

Ideas to try:

  • Talk to your team (both together and individually).
  • Think about those questions they may have of, “What does this mean for me?”
  • Talk through those questions together, and get their buy-in so that they can see how this will benefit them.
  1. Start, iterate, and adjust

Sarah had a bit of a perfectionist streak. She wanted her ideas to be perfectly formed and her plans, documents, and presentations to impress and influence. She would often send things to her colleagues at the last minute because she was busy perfecting them. They felt frustrated because they didn’t have proper time to review or contribute to the documents, and disrespected and dismissed because ideas came so fully formed, and so late in the process, that it seemed as though she didn’t really want to consider their contributions anyway.

Ideas to try:

  • Bring others along with you and be ok with it being messy.
  • Too often, people leading change go off and work hard on coming up with strategic visions, communication plans, and all the other pieces of the puzzle.
    • Ask yourself, who can I include in each part of the plan (the vision, the communication, etc.)?
  1. Stick with it

Sarah was impatient to see the bold changes she envisioned enacted quickly. She was frustrated that things were taking so long. She often tried to ‘speed things up,’ which usually resulted in the initiative screeching to a halt.

Ideas to try:

  • Appreciate that people adapt to and embrace change at different paces.
    • This can be something as small as a new milestone document and as large as company culture change.
  • Allow for the needed time.
    • Sometimes change can happen quickly, and sometimes people need to all get on the same page first.

I’m happy to say that Sarah and the team are back on track, working well together, and getting pretty excited about what’s possible in their future. Are they exactly where Sarah wanted them to be a year ago? No. But they are much, much further ahead than they were 3 months ago. They’re working well together, staying curious, and definitely moving in the right direction together.

Staying Mindful

Staying Mindful

So, did you try some of the mindfulness tips from last week?

Normally, we’ve got a number of paragraphs with thoughts and ideas.

This week, we’re doing something a little different – we’re going more interactive!

First, we’d encourage you to look at the clock and make sure you’ve got about 15 minutes free.

Next, set a timer on your phone for 1 minute.

Close your eyes for a minute and think about your breathing.

           Focus on your breath and clear your mind.

Now, take out a piece of paper and set your timer for 5 minutes.

          Write down everything that comes to mind. Don’t try to think or solve any problems. Just. Write.

How are you feeling? Maybe some of those things that were stressing you out are now on paper and not just being stored in your mind?

Last, think though or write about 1 or all of these questions:

  • What will I do today that will matter 1 year from now?
  • What is 1 thing I want to accomplish today?
  • Is what I am doing the best use of my time?
  • Am I having fun? How come?

We’ve found that staying mindful and present takes a combination of little checks through out your day (breathing when you are frustrated or enjoying your food instead of scarfing down a couple of chips) and taking a couple minutes of intentional time to reground yourself amidst the stress.

Try it out and let us know your thoughts!

You in 2017

You in 2017

We’ve made it – welcome to 2017!

Have an aversion to New Year’s resolutions?

Try something new with us to measure success in 2017.

We’ll be thinking of three words that relate to a specific part of our lives. These words will be our words of encouragement, challenge, or continuation of growth in 2017!

Ready? Let’s begin:

The first word (or phrase) will relate to your professional life.

In thinking about where you are and where you’d like to go, what is one word that you want to be able to use to describe your professional life throughout 2017?

Here are some words to get those juices flowing:

  • Grow
  • Hitting New Goals
  • Delegator
  • Communicator
  • Emerging Leader

As you are making decisions, taking on new projects, and working with others, use the lens of your word – pushing you to further greatness!

The next word (or phrase) will relate to your personal life.

In thinking about your personal relationships, hobbies, and interests, what is one word you’d like to use to describe that through 2017?

This could be something like:

  • Thoughtful
  • Assertive
  • 10k Finisher
  • Emerging Artist

AWESOME!

Now on to the last word (or phrase). Your last word is something new you want to try this year.

Maybe you’ve always wanted to travel to New York, but never have.

Or you’re not totally comfortable speaking in front of people and want to work on that.

Or maybe you think that people who have herb gardens are really cool, but you haven’t had one (and secretly, you’d like to try!).

We ALL have those things. So, think about what it is for you and choose a word that represents it!

Got your words? Now – write these down and stick them somewhere you look often. Write it in cool letters and frame it, or even just throw it on your computer desktop.

Come back next week for some next steps!

Prepping Your Team for the Holidays

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Each day we knock out is one day closer to the end of the year!

You know, as well as your team, that there is a lot to get done this time of year. Not to mention the uncommonly large number of personal festivities we all have going on!

One suggestion that rings true throughout the year, but especially during the holidays, is to stay transparent with your team on expectations and deadlines..

You want your team to have a great time with their friends and family AND you want to maintain their fabulous performance! Transparency will help.

What does that mean?

Think about what expectations you hold for your team. These could be things like:

  • Having v2 of product development complete by December 31st
  • Continuing to provide the same level of customer satisfaction your brand is known for
  • Holding a strategy meeting to look into what you can do differently in the first few months of 2017
  • Making sure your team actually takes a couple of days off to avoid burnout

In your next 1×1 or team meeting, share what you want to see happen over the next few weeks.

By openly discussing your expectations and timelines envisioned (or promised!), you’ll avoid hearsay and allow your team the opportunity to ask questions to help further clarify what you need from them (and how you can help them knock it out of the park!).

Try it out and let us know how it goes!